News

Carbon Sciences Extends Graphene Research Project with University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB)

   
University to Continue Research and Development of New Graphene-Based Optical Modulator, a Fiber Optic Component Designed to Enable Ultrafast Data Center Communication for Cloud Computing

Santa Barbara, CA - June 7, 2016 - Carbon Sciences, Inc. (CABN), developer of breakthrough technologies based on graphene, the new miracle material, today announced that the Company has extended its Sponsored Research Agreement with the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

The extension will allow UCSB to continue the research and development of a potentially ultrafast optical modulator based on graphene. An optical modulator is a critical fiber optic component for the encoding and transmission of digital data.

Graphene, being 1 million times thinner than a strand of human hair and 200 times stronger than steel, boasts the capability of delivering extreme high speed and tunable conductivity. Based on these fundamental properties, graphene has the potential to be used in modulating light at very high speeds, yielding a heightened capacity to efficiently encode and transmit digital data.

In an effort to develop an ultrafast, low cost, and low power, graphene-based optical modulator, Carbon Sciences has proactively engaged UCSB, a global leader in bioengineering, chemical and computational engineering, materials science, nanotechnology and physics. The 6-month research program that commenced in January 2016 has been extended for an additional 3 months. This will allow the research team to complete a prototype device and perform various measurements to determine the effectiveness and potential of the design.

Bill Beifuss, President of Carbon Sciences, commented, We believe that the world is on the threshold of a new era in Cloud computing, where the rising demand for data reflects an ongoing upsurge in people, places and things. Its exciting to see how our research has progressed and we look forward, with great anticipation, to what the future has in store for this technology, our Company, and our shareholders.

Fiber optic technology, being the backbone of the Internet, has encountered explosive growth in Internet data, in large part as a result of an ever-growing number of Cloud-based services such as Netflix, Facebook, and Google. Consequently, the fundamental speed limits of current state-of-the-art fiber optic materials are being substantially challenged. In consideration, Management believes that new materials, such as graphene, must be explored and used to significantly increase the speed of data movement in the Cloud. The Company believes that graphene technology has the potential to revolutionize ultrafast data communication. Thereby unleashing a global era of high-resolution video on demand, high fidelity music streaming, high volume e-commerce and many more Cloud-based services.

UCSB boasts five Nobel Laureates (four in sciences and engineering) and one winner of the prestigious Millennium Technology Prize. The 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities ranked UCSB Engineering/Technology and Computer Science as #7 in the world.

About Carbon Sciences, Inc.

Carbon Sciences is developing breakthrough technologies based on graphene, the new miracle material. Graphene, a sheet of pure carbon that is only one atom thick, is flexible, transparent, impermeable to moisture, stronger than diamonds and more conductive than gold. After successfully exploring methods to produce low cost graphene, Carbon Sciences is now developing a new graphene-based optical modulator, a critical fiber optics component needed to help unclog the existing bottlenecks and enable ultrafast communication in data centers for Cloud computing. The Company is also undertaking a growth-by-acquisition strategy to extend its presence in the $3.8 trillion worldwide information technology (IT) market with a particular focus on profitable IT services providers.



Date: Tuesday, June 07, 2016


Back

Continue to About Carbon Sciences